Insects living in the Collodi Butterfly House

Insects living in the Collodi Butterfly House
Stick Insect

Stick Insect
Scientific name: Baculum extradentatum (Brunner 1907)
Origin: South-east Asia

insetto_stecco_180The stick insect belongs to the group of Phasmids, together with 2,500 other species, mainly found in tropical areas. The group includes the longest insect of all, the Pharnacia serratipes of Indonesia, which can reach 33 centimetres in length. The species exhibit sexual dimorphism: the females differ from the males, which are slimmer and have an enlargement at the end of their abdomen.
Their eggs resemble small seeds. Phasmids are able to regenerate lost body parts. They can also reproduce by parthenogenesis, without the contribution of the males.

Bee

Bee
Scientific name: Apis mellifera (Linnaeus, 1758)
Origin: Italy

Api e regina_CC_lightThis species is known to all for its production of honey and its fascinating life organised in complex communities. It is also highly important for plant reproduction, due to its “involuntary” pollination of flowers while flying from one to another to collect nectar.
Not everyone has the opportunity to see bees in their hives, but you can do so in the Collodi Butterfly House, through a glass panel. One side of the hive is open to the outside so that the bees can fly around and freely collect nectar.

 

Giant Peruvian Cockroach
Giant Peruvian Cockroach
Scientific name: Archimandrita tesselata
Origin: South and Central America

archimandrita_tessellata_0038b_l.d_180This is one of the largest and most solid cockroaches. The juvenile forms, neanides, are without wings. The neanides and nymphs are brownish in colour. The males are longer and narrower than the females. The juvenile insects normally remain hidden during the day. Despite having wings, this species cannot fly very well due to its heavy weight. Modern-day cockroaches are a species of living fossils, similar to their ancestors of over 250 million years ago.